Google+ Followers

Thursday, 3 November 2011

HELP!! Neil Horan Nazi Priest Censors Blog


I received the following e-mail on 19th October from Google saying it had taken down a post on the Hitler loving priest who performed for the Zionists outside the Albert Hall on September 1st. Apparently I’ve infringed copyright but most of the photographs were taken by Brian Robinson. Can anyone figure out from this DMCA site what exactly they are referring to?

The post itself was pretty inconsequential and just one more bit of evidence that anti-Semites love Israel. I'm not willing to jeapordise the existence of the blog by reposting stuff on this twerp but on the other hand I don't like censorship. If anyone can figure out what it is that is specifically objected to I'd be grateful.

Thanks

Tony Greenstein

>>Blogger Blog takedown notificati​on

support@blogger.com

show details Oct 19

Blogger has been notified, according to the terms of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA), that certain content in your blog is alleged to infringe upon the copyrights of others. As a result, we have reset the post(s) to \"draft\" status. (If we did not do so, we would be subject to a claim of copyright infringement, regardless of its merits. The URL(s) of the allegedly infringing post(s) may be found at the end of this message.) This means that your post - and any images, links or other content - is not gone. You may edit the post to remove the offending content and republish, at which point the post in question will be visible to your readers again.

A bit of background: The DMCA is a United States copyright law that provides guidelines for online service provider liability in case of copyright infringement. If you believe that you have the rights to post the content at issue here, you can file a counter-claim. For more information on our DMCA policy, including how to file a counter-claim, please see http://www.google.com/dmca.html.

The notice that we received, with any personally identifying information removed, will be posted online by a service called Chilling Effects at http://www.chillingeffects.org. We do this in accordance with the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA). You can search for the DMCA notice associated with the removal of your content by going to the Chilling Effects search page at http://www.chillingeffects.org/search.cgi and entering in the URL of the blog post that was removed.

If it is brought to our attention that you have republished the post without removing the content/link in question, then we will delete your post and count it as a violation on your account. Repeated violations to our Terms of Service may result in further remedial action taken against your Blogger account including deleting your blog and/or terminating your account. If you have legal questions about this notification, you should retain your own legal counsel.

Sincerely,

The Blogger Team

Affected URLs:

http://azvsas.blogspot.com/2011/09/neil-horan-deranged-and-hitler-loving.html

We have received a DMCA complaint for your blog, Tony Greenstein's Blog. An email with the details of the complaint was sent to you on 19-Oct-2011 , and we reset the post status to "Draft"; you can edit it here. You may republish the post with the offending content and/or link(s) removed. If you believe that you have the rights to post this content, you can file a counter-claim with us. For more on our DMCA policy, please click here. Thank you for your prompt attention.

1 comment:

Brian Robinson said...

See http://nealhibbert.com/street-photography/uk-law-and-street-photography/

eg 'It is your right as a citizen to freely take photographs in public places ...'
---

http://www.sirimo.co.uk/2009/05/14/uk-photographers-rights-v2/

Free Download – UK Photographers Rights v2

'For images of people in public places, the key seems to be whether the place is one where a person would have a reasonable expectation of privacy and the courts have greatly extended the areas where this might be the case.'

---

I can't find the link at the moment, but I recall another guide for UK photographers which said that if someone is in a public place, eg the street, quite simply it's OK to take a photo of them (they can expect to possibly be photographed). However, publication of such photos may be a different matter, as the free download guide (above link) makes clear.